EliotPargament

Eliot Pargament an Experienced Farrier Caring for All Breeds & Disciplines

Eliot Pargament is a farrier and business owner. Presently, Eliot Pargament provides his services to those in and around Washington DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware. He can be reached at (703) 727-5281, or mingusman14@gmail.com.

Eliot Pargament

Horses are some of the most elegant and powerful creatures on earth. To own one is a true privilege as well as a huge responsibility. From training to veterinary care, equines can be more challenging than many animals to care for, though the payoff is well worth all the hard work. One of the best resources in your equine care arsenal is your local farrier. Eliot Pargament Arkansas, an experienced equine expert, is a trusted AFA- certified farrier servicing the Maryland, Virginia, Washington D.C., and Delaware area.

After many years of equine experience, Eliot Pargament graduated from the “Harvard” of horseshoeing, the Kentucky Horse Shoeing School in Richmond, after graduating from the Tuscon School of Horseshoeing. He then apprenticed in the Washington, D.C., area, working with some of the most knowledgeable and respected farriers in the U.S.. Eliot Pargament worked as an assistant instructor at the University of Maryland and continues to take part in teaching and educational opportunities in the U.S. and Hamburg, Germany.

Eliot Pargament is the owner of Metro Farrier Services and has traveled the U.S. working at several horse shows and rodeos, including The Prince George’s Equestrian Center – Best Thoroughbred Hunter/Jumper Show. He was also a farrier at the Black-Eyed Susan Indoor Summer Classic at The Prince George’s Equestrian Center.

In addition to his wealth of knowledge and experience, Eliot Pargament brings to his work a true passion for horses and equine care. He works with all breeds and disciplines and is adept at working with routine work, including regular shoes and trims, as well as hot/cold and therapeutic shoeing, and treatment for laminitis.

Eliot Pargament’s customers know him as a dependable, patient professional who has his clients’ and horses’ best interests in mind at all times. More than providing hoof care and shoeing, he strives to educate his clients to help them better care for their animals and prevent issues. This includes educating owners about the importance of cleaning the horse’s shoes at least twice a day, ideally before and after putting the horse out or riding, to check for issues such as lodged objects or signs of trouble such as laminitis or founder.

Eliot Pargament Explains How to Prevent Laminitis in Horses

Eliot Pargament
Eliot Pargament

Eliot Pargament is a farrier and business owner. Presently, Eliot Pargament provides his services to those in and around Washington DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware. He can be reached at (703) 727-5281, or mingusman14@gmail.com.

A horse’s feet may not be their most beautiful feature, but they are one of the most essential. Whether you’re an amateur rider or professional equestrian, Eliot Pargament, a Certified Farrier and graduate of Tucson School of Horseshoeing, advises that inspecting and cleaning a horse’s feet on at least a daily basis is crucial. One reason, he said, is it provides an opportunity to check for serious conditions like laminitis.

What Is Laminitis?

Laminitis is inflammation in the laminae in the horse’s foot. It can present in any feet but is most common in the front feet, and is caused by temporary or long-term disrupted blood flow. The laminae secure the coffin bone to the hoof wall. As in humans, chronic inflammation can permanently weaken the structures and the bond between the wall and bone. Untreated, Eliot Pargament warns the bone and hoof wall can separate, resulting in a displaced coffin bone which can eventually penetrate the sole. The condition is sometimes confused with founder but the two are not interchangeable. Founder is a long-term condition associated with a rotated coffin bone, while laminitis is an acute incident.

What Causes Laminitis?

Many factors can cause laminitis, some of which are preventable and others of which are not. Eliot Pargament said some breeds, like Morgans, donkeys, and ponies, are naturally predisposed to the condition. However, you can reduce the risk. Some risk factors include high fever, severe colic, a retained placenta after foaling, bedding made with black walnut shavings, Potomac Horse Fever, various foot diseases, digestive upsets, sudden access to large amounts of lush foliage (also known as “grass founder”), blood poisoning (such as that from chemicals used to treat plants), and excessive weight-bearing on one leg. Being overweight or sustaining trauma to the foot can also cause laminitis.

Signs & Symptoms

When cleaning your horse’s feet, keep an eye out for potential signs of laminitis or other issues. These include warm feet or a faster-than-usual digital pulse, as well as rings in the hoof wall, bruised soles, or a widened white line. Watch for unusual behavior as well, such as an abnormal gate or the appearance of “walking on eggshells.” Watch for shifting while standing, lameness while turning or standing, or a “sawhorse” stance with the weight shifted to their hind feet and front legs outstretched.

Treatment

If you suspect your horse has laminitis, call a veterinarian or certified farrier as soon as possible. Depending on the cause and severity of the condition, Eliot Pargament says treatment may include IV fluids, anti-endotoxic medications, pain medication such as NSAIDs, antibiotics, vasodilators and bedding changes for better sole support. In severe cases, the farrier or vet may recommend lidocaine patches or a catheter. Changing the shoeing can also significantly improve the horse’s comfort. Eliot Pargament is experienced in changing the shoes on laminitic horses.

More on Eliot Pargament

Eliot Pargament has been a farrier since 2011. After graduating from the Tuscon School of Horseshoeing, he completed a training program at the “Harvard” of horseshoeing, the Kentucky Horse Shoeing School in Richmond. After apprenticing in the Washington D.C. area, Eliot Pargament started his business Metro Farrier Services. He has worked closely with an expert farrier known for his skillful handling of difficult shoeing procedures and served as an assistant instructor at the University of Maryland. Eliot Pargament has been a traveling farrier at several rodeos. He also continues his education via various training seminars and competitions around the U.S. and in Hamburg, Germany. Eliot services the Maryland, Virginia, Washington D.C., and Delaware area.

Eliot Pargament’s 3 Tips for Horse Foot Care

Eliot Pargament

Eliot Pargament is a farrier and business owner. Presently, Eliot Pargament provides his services to those in and around Washington DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware. He can be reached at (703) 727-5281, or mingusman14@gmail.com. ‬

As any equine enthusiast knows, horses give what they receive. When treated with love and quality care, they can be as loyal as dogs and as strong and hearty as oxen. For centuries, humans have utilized horses for their magnificent power and revered them for their exceptional elegance and beauty. While anyone can own a horse, it takes a knowledgeable and compassionate hand to bring out the best in these amazing creatures. Eliot Pargament, a professional Certified Farrier and graduate of the Tucson School of Horseshoeing, says caring for a horse’s feet is one the most important things any owner or keeper can do to maintain an animal’s health and performance. Here are his tips.

3 Tips for Better Horse Foot Care

1) Pick the Feet
The most basic but crucial step is to pick your horse’s hooves. Eliot Pargament says he encounters a surprising number of owners who believe picking is an occasional job to be done by the farrier. But picking should be done daily to maintain foot health and prevent common hoof issues. Do this before you ride, to ensure there are no objects wedged in the shoe before you put additional weight on the foot. Repeat after riding and before turning the horse in at night. In the morning, check again to remove manure and look for signs of thrush. Once you’ve pried out debris, clear the crevice of the frog and scrape off remaining bits with the pick tip. Finish by brushing with a stiff brush.

2) Look for Signs of Trouble
As you’re cleaning the feet, look for signs of problems such as thrush. Thrush is a common bacterial condition typically caused by standing manure or wet, dirty conditions. It will cause a foul odor and dark oozing matter to emit from the frog cleft. As the condition progresses, it will become cheese-like. Call a farrier or veterinarian as soon as you notice signs of thrush, Eliot Pargament advises. Untreated, it can lead to lameness. Also, inspect the feet for issues such as punctures or cracks. These, too, require a farrier’s prompt attention. Finally, check your horse’s digital pulse and temperature. If the pulse seems stronger or temperature warmer than normal, it may be a result of an abscess inside the hoof. If you notice a stronger-than-usual pulse and increase in the temperature in both front feet, schedule a visit with your veterinarian immediately as this may be a sign of laminitis, which can cause significant hoof damage and even death, if untreated.

3) See the Farrier Regularly
On average, a farrier should see to your horse every six to eight weeks. However, if your farrier is correcting an issue like a club foot or under-run heels, you may need more frequent appointments. The farrier will not only trim and balance the feet but will also closely examine them for signs of problems. Nipping an issue in the bud is essential to prevent more serious, and painful, conditions.

More on Eliot Pargament

Eliot Pargament has been a farrier since 2011. After graduating from the Tuscon School of Horseshoeing, he completed a training program at the “Harvard” of horseshoeing, the Kentucky Horse Shoeing School in Richmond. After apprenticing in the Washington D.C. area, Eliot Pargament started his business Metro Farrier Services. He has worked closely with Mike Poe, an expert farrier known for his skillful handling of difficult shoeing procedures, and served as an assistant instructor at the University of Maryland. Eliot Pargament has been a traveling farrier at several rodeos. He also continues his education via various training seminars and competitions around the U.S. and in Hamburg, Germany. Eliot services the Maryland, Virginia, Washington D.C., and Delaware area.

How Eliot Pargament Puts His Farrier Training To Good Use

Eliot Pargament is a farrier and business owner. Presently, Eliot Pargament provides his services to those in and around Washington DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware. Eliot can be reached at (703) 727-5281, or mingusman14@gmail.com. ‬

Eliot Pargament

Eliot Pargament is currently looking to grow his clientele and invites you to learn more about his skills as a farrier. Eliot started his company, Metro Farrier Services, after many years of training and hands-on experience.

Eliot Pargament enjoys working with mammals of the Equidae family. He spends his days working on the hooves of horses and mules to ensure they can walk comfortably.

Eliot has a fascination with large animals. Working with them every day is a real passion of his; it is why he became a certified farrier.

A farrier is an expert in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of horse hooves. It also involves the placing of shoes on the hooves of horses, when necessary.

The Equidae family he works with has seven species, including many breeds of horses, donkeys, zebras, ponies, and mules. He loves his profession so much that Eliot Pargament opened his own farrier company called Metro Farrier.

Eliot trained to become a qualified farrier at a couple of different schools and has acquired a lot of hands-on experience over the years. The first farrier training he received was at the Tucson School of Horseshoeing. His lessons educated him about all kinds of large hoofed animals that belong to the Equidae family.

Eliot Pargament then attended another school regularly called the “Harvard of horseshoeing schools.” Its real name is Kentucky Horseshoeing School, and it is located in Richmond, KY. Eliot became a fully certified Farrier in 2011. Once his training finished, Eliot shifted from being a student to an apprentice. His apprenticeship took place in the Washington DC area.

Eliot Pargament has put his training to be a farrier to good use. He has served as a traveling farrier at various rodeos and attended numerous training seminars.

The treatment Eliot Pargament specializes in as a farrier is a long list, including:

  • General farrier services
  • Custom blacksmithing
  • Handmade shoe
  • Regular shoes, and trims
  • Corrective and lameness shoeing

Being able to care for hooved animals is an essential part of his life. Eliot looks forward to continuing working in this profession for years to come.

Learn more about Eliot Pargament and the farrier services he offers in your area. Connect with him via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/eliot-pargament-5a880a118/.

Eliot hopes to hear from you and looks forward to taking great care of the shoes of your horse(s).

Certified Farrier Eliot Pargament Completed Training At The “Harvard” Of Horseshoeing School In Kentucky

Eliot Pargament is a farrier and business owner. Presently, Eliot Pargament provides his services to those in and around Washington DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware. He can be reached at (703) 727-5281, or mingusman14@gmail.com. ‬

Eliot Pargament is currently looking to grow his clientele and invites you to learn more about his skills as a farrier. Eliot started his company, Metro Farrier Services, after many years of training and hands-on experience.

Eliot Pargament
A farrier is an expert in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of horse hooves. It also involves the placing of shoes on the hooves of horses, when necessary.

Eliot Pargament earned his credential of Certified Farrier in 2011 and has worked as one ever since.

Eliot received his very first farrier training at the Tucson School of Horseshoeing in Tucson. When he completed the program, he instantly knew he would go on to gain more farrier education.

It was not long after his first training session that Eliot Pargament went on to complete another program at Kentucky Horseshoeing school located in Richmond, KY. This training was at the Kentucky school that is often seen as the “Harvard” of horseshoeing schools. Its actual name is Kentucky Horseshoeing School located in Richmond, KY. After completing his training in Kentucky, Eliot Pargament served as an apprentice in the Washington DC area.

Eventually, Eliot Pargament did go back to school, but not as a student. Instead, he served at the University of Maryland as an assistant instructor.

Eliot Pargament considers continuing education very important and is always searching for new and improved techniques to use on horses.

Eliot Pargament specializes in all breeds of horse, and his treatments include:

-Corrective and lameness shoeing
-Custom blacksmithing
-Draft horses
-Dressage horses
-General farrier work
-Handmade shoes
-Hot shoeing
-Regular shoes, and trims
-Plus much more

Connect with Eliot Pargament via LinkedIn:
Linkedin Profile URL: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eliot-pargament-5a880a118/

Eliot hopes to hear from you and looks forward to taking great care of the shoes of your horse(s).